WiGig Alliance completes multi-gigabit 60GHz wireless specification: let the streaming begin

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The WiGig Alliance captured our imaginations back in May, but now it seems that the world of multi-gigabit streaming is so close, we can taste the data slipping over our tonguea on their way to the next access point. Put simply, the specification that the group has been toiling on over the past few months is finally complete, and while some of its members have been prototyping wares along the way, this 1.0 announcement effectively opens the flood gates for partnering outfits to implement it into their gear. In case you’re curious as to how 60GHz will help you, have a listen: WiGig enables wireless transfer rates more than ten times faster than today’s fastest wireless LAN, and it’s completely backward compatible with existing WiFi devices. As we’ve already seen with those totally bodacious dual-band (2.4GHz / 5GHz) routers, having another band with this kind of speed potential can only mean great things for the future.
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ASUS Eee PC 1201N dons burgundy garb, you still can’t have one

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Say hello to the little friend you already know and want, this time dressed in a more extrovert red attire. We don’t yet know whether this 1201N variant will be finding retail shelves or if it’s just a pretty prototype, but that doesn’t make too much difference at this point. With the classical black model still only available on a pre-order basis (with a mid-January landing date) the closest you’ll be getting to ASUS’ Ion-powered 12-incher is glamor shots like these. Well, either that or a forthcoming Engadget review, both are good.

Sony says PS3 motion controller was codenamed ‘Gem,’ might or might not actually be called Gem

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We never heard much more of the rumored Sphere codename for Sony’s PlayStation 3 motion controller since it cropped up a few months ago, but it looks like we now finally have another name for it besides “PlayStation Motion Controller.” That word initially came from EA’s John Riccitiello, who let slip the name “Gem” during his talk at the UBS 37th Annual Global Media Conference when speaking about Sony’s and Microsoft’s new motion controllers. Just odd enough to work? Well, not so fast, as Sony would only go so far as to confirm to Kotaku that Gem was “an early code name for the product,” adding that they “haven’t announced final name at this point.” Not exactly a full-on non-denial denial, to be sure, but it would seem that the door for Gem is at least open a tiny crack.

Squeezebox Touch delayed until February: Bah, Humbug!

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Despite being proudly introduced to the world in early September, it seems as if Logitech’s Squeezebox Touch is still fighting the good fight on its way to mass production. Originally, the device was slated to go on sale this month in order to get wrapped and tucked beneath a-many Christmas tree, but now we’ve heard directly from the company that it won’t be shipping out until February 2010. We took a brief tour around the web, and sure enough, most respected e-tailers aren’t showing any stock (or any sign of stock); what’s odd is that we know at least a few of these things leaked out onto the market, though the whole “Logitech denying its existence” scenario that we saw play out back in August certainly makes a lot more sense now. Either way, it looks as if you’ll be waiting if you’re believing the official word, which just so happens to be quoted in full after the break.

Square iPhone payment system gets itself a website, showcased in public

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Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey and the quiet startup formerly known as Squirrel are finally opening up a bit. The company now called Square, as we noted back in October, has launched a website for its iPhone payment dongle, although it’s still in somewhat private beta testing. TechCrunch managed to catch up with Dorsey, who gave a brief overview of the product and then showed it off by charging $4 for a cup of coffee — so it goes in San Francisco.

Dell Precision M6500 mixes Core i7 with business savvy

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In typical Dell style, the new Precision M6500 17-inch workhorse laptop has shown up on the company’s website with nary a peep of self-congratulatory PR from Round Rock. Notable as the successor to the well-juiced M6400 and its even gaudier Covet variant, the M6500 boasts wallet-busting specs like a Core i7-920XM allied to a maximum of 16GB DDR3 memory speeding along at 1,333MHz, a choice of ATI FirePro M7740 or NVIDIA Quadro FX 3800M workstation graphics chips, support for up to three storage devices with optional RAID configurations, and a 1920 x 1200 LED-backlit display. The machine is not quite yet available to purchase, meaning it’s safe to go beyond the read link without fearing any heart-stopping sticker shock.

Oregon Scientific’s +ECO Solar Weather Clock and Station don’t predict solar weather

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Oregon Scientific expands solar-powered +ECO line with Solar Weather Clock and Station

Like the looks of Oregon Scientific’s solar-powered +ECO Clima Control unit but don’t need something that sophisticated — or expensive? The company has just expanded the line with two (slightly) more affordable options for budget and environmentally conscious folks like you. First up is the $100 +ECO Solar Weather Station, which provides the same functionality as its $20 more expensive predecessor, monitoring temperature and humidity in multiple locations and recharging itself via detachable solar panel, but does so with a smaller screen capable of showing indoor and outdoor temperature, time, and an icon representing the coming weather. Also on offer is the $70 +ECO Solar Weather Clock, pictured below, which ditches the weather display and the ability to display humidity, things that may or may not be much of a loss depending on your meteorological inclinations.

Sony’s FVA-U1 reads veins, coming to Japan this month

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Sony has finally delivered on its Mofiria promise with what it claims is the world’s smallest and lightest finger vein reader. That assertion may be challenged by Hitachi, whose 3mm-thick scanner promises to be even smaller, but the critical difference here is that the FVA-U1 is about to go on sale in Japan come December 18, whereas Hitachi’s hardware is nowhere to be found. The Sony scanner weighs a measly 33 grams, hooks up via USB, and adds an extra layer of biometric protection for your most precious data. Whether carrying around an extra dongle just to protect some Excel spreadsheets and your Outlook account is worth it, we leave up to you.

Nikon Coolpix S70 review: excellent spec, but mediocre image quality

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We’ll admit we save our Nikon excitement for the sort of gear that comes with “bad mother” stitched into its casing, but sometimes even our jaded souls can get intrigued by a compact. This particular slimline unit has an OLED touchscreen display, with the additional inclusion of multitouch and gesture support, which already gets it right up to speed on the latest trends. With a 5x optical zoom, 12 megapixel sensor, and 720p/30fps video, it’s also no slouch on the spec sheet, but reviewers at Photography Blog found a few shortcomings. The Nikon S70 is said to be overly reliant on the 3.5-inch touch display for controls, and although the camera is both thin and ultrafast to start up, those benefits come at the greatest cost of all: image quality is only average, and noise handling is poor even at base ISO. We’ll file this one in our “vivacious but vapid” archive while you busy yourself with reading the full review.

Buffalo SuperSpeed USB 3.0 external hard drive reviewed, fast

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Was anybody else surprised to see that Buffalo (fine purveyors of USB hardware, including kitschy dice speakers, and teeny, tiny thumb drives) was able to start pushing USB 3.0 hardware out the door so quickly? The fine citizens of TweakTown definitely were — and now they’ve gone and given HD-HXU3 external hard drive a thorough going over. The verdict? They’ve likened performance to that of an internal drive — not disappointing in the least. Physically, this guy is constructed “very well, much better than any of the enclosures that are sold without a drive” that the reviewer has tested. The only sticking point? The price seems a little steep — and since USB 3.0 will soon be ubiquitous anyways, perhaps you want to hold out a minute before investing. But if the latest and greatest is your bag, this ain’t a bad place to start. Hit the source link for the full story.
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