Posts tagged Canon

Canon Rebel T3 DSLR reviewed: a safe bet for first-time shooters

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Are you a true contrarian looking for a camera that befits your nonconformist lifestyle? Well, Canon’s latest entry-level DSLR may not be the most unruly camera out, but at least it sports a moniker that fits the bill. The Canon T3 Rebel, also known as the EOS 1100D, is a 12.2-megapixel affair designed with the DSLR newbie in mind, and according to a review over at PhotographyBlog, it doesn’t sacrifice image quality for ease of use. Touted as a successor to the Rebel XS, the T3 actually carries over some useful features from its more sophisticated sibling, the T3i, including a user-friendly control layout, but lacks the camera’s Scene Intelligent auto mode and extensive list of creative filters. Aside from that, the reviewer found T3′s grips too slick and its diminutive LCD screen a minor setback, but was quick to point out that none of these is a deal-breaker. In fact, aside from a bit of noise encountered at the highest ISO setting, the camera delivers high quality photographs even in low light. All things considered, it looks like the Rebel T3 is a “responsive and intuitive DSLR” for the novice photog, and at $600, it’s got at least some of the competition beat. Now, we won’t tell you what to do, but if we were you, we’d click the source link to see how the T3 stacks up.

Canon SD4500 IS reviewed: gets recommended despite some glaring faults

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Canon’s latest midrange SD4500 point and shoot — known as the IXUS 1000 HS in Europe — has scored a “Recommended” review by the folks at Photography Blog thanks largely to its excellent image quality (particularly with night shots) and the presence of a big 10x zoom lens packed inside its Elph body. The testers were concerned, though, with the camera’s poor 150-shot battery life, 36mm not-so-wide-angle setting and minimal physical controls — which may drive experienced users loco from excessive button mashing. Its $299 price tag is also precariously close to the beloved Canon S95, which offers significantly better performance for only $70 more. Still, if your budget is rigid and size is key, the SD4500 should suit you and your pockets nicely. To read the full review by the folks at Photography Blog, thanks.

Canon PowerShot G12 scores predictably glowing review

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Canon PowerShot G12 scores predictably glowing review

If it’s a pocketable PowerShot and its name begins with ‘G’ you can be pretty sure it’ll be a good performer, and Canon‘s latest is no exception. The $499 G12 is the sequential successor to the G11 and, as is typical for the range, it isn’t a revolutionary leap forward. The G12 makes use of its predecessor’s 10 megapixel sensor situated behind the same 5x zoom lens and offering the same suite of full manual controls. New this year is a 720p24 video recording mode with stereo mics, finally bringing this camera into the HD age — but sadly doing so without use of that zoom. Also new is an HDR mode, stitching together three photos to make those vampires hiding in the shadows really pop. According to Photography Blog those improvements plus a few other niceties make this a particularly solid compact, even if its chunky dimensions as ever push the definition of that term.

Canon developing smaller DSLRs to compete with mirrorless cameras?

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Ever since we heard that Nikon was joining the league of mirrorless cameras, the whole world’s been waiting for its arch rival to make the next move in the battle of smaller prosumer cameras. Today, Canon finally gave away some hints about which camp it’ll side with — probably just sticking with traditional DSLRs, but smaller. Canon’s Masaya Maeda didn’t share any specific details, but here’s how he dodged Reuters inquiry: “It’s not a question of whether or not you have a mirror. There is a consumer need for good-quality cameras to be made smaller. We will meet this need.” And to add some icing to that bland statement, Maeda reinforced that it wouldn’t be a challenge for his company to retain a mirror (hence a viewfinder, which is essential for obtaining better results and higher shooting rates) in a smaller design, and that they’ve made very small SLR cameras before (likely in reference to the film era). Whatever happens, here’s hoping that Canon’s new toy won’t be any bigger than the much-loved G11.

Photography is dead, long live photos

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Portraying the digital still camera as an endangered species has been a popular pastime for years in the cellphone industry, and with the high-resolution stills and high-definition video capabilities of the latest round of smartphones, the argument is more convincing than ever when applied to the casual snapshot. But this week at the World Expo in Shanghai, Canon — a name synonymous with high-quality photography — offered a vision of a device that not only supersedes the digital still camera, but will likely eliminate photography as we know it.

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Canon VIXIA HF M32 adds SDXC compatibility, has 64GB of its own flash anyway

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Talk about a bad time to introduce your latest camcorder. Hot on the heels of Sony’s category-redefining NEX-VG10, Canon is coming out with a humble refresher of its VIXIA line of consumer shooters (known as Legria in Europe). It’s as incremental as upgrades get, with the HF M32 doubling its predecessor’s 32GB of internal storage and adding in SDXC memory card compatibility. Canon’s Relay Recording feature will allow you to transition from one storage cell to another without interrupting your video, but it’s something the M31 already offers. The rest of the specs are also familiar: a HD CMOS sensor capable of 3 megapixel stills, a 15x optical zoom lens with both optical and powered image stabilization, a 2.7-inch touchscreen LCD with Touch and Track functionality, and the same DIGIC DV III processor that’s been knocking about since last year. Still, you’ve gotta be pretty good to last that long in this industry, so maybe it’s worth giving this camera a look if you have $1,000 to spend and can wait for a September delivery.

How would you change Canon’s EOS Rebel T2i?

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Canon just recently sold its 20 millionth digital EOS camera, so there’s a better-than-average chance that the company’s EOS Rebel T2i made up a bulk of those final sales leading up to the milestone. If you’ve been shooting (and shooting… and shooting) with your new T2i over the past few months, we’re interested in hearing how exactly you’d like to tweak things. Is the 1080p movie mode living up to the hype? Would you change the body design in any way? Happy with the kit lens? Wishing you would’ve sprung for a full-frame cam instead? Would you have preferred the option to get a Harlequin edition? Go on and speak out below — we’ve heard that these things have been hard to come by, so we’re sure a few of you are cradling one in your left arm right now.

Canon produces 40 millionth EOS-series SLR, half of ‘em digital

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Oh, Canon — you and your milestones. Just under two years ago, you took time out of your busy schedule to gloat about the shipment of your 100 millionth compact camera, and today you’re bragging about the production of your 40 millionth EOS-series SLR camera. In all seriousness, we’re pretty proud of ya. After all, it took a full decade (1987 to 1997) for you to conjure up 10 million EOS film cameras, and six more after that to hit the magical 20 million mark. Once you blew through 30 million in 2007, it took but 28 months to get where you are today. What’s really wild, though, is that half of the milestone is all digital, and given the state of film today, we’re guessing that the delta between the two will only grow larger in the future. You’ve come a long way since the introduction of the EOS-1, but we know you’ve got a few surprises in store yet — how’s about a sub-$1,000 DSLR that shoots native 4K video and has an ISO ceiling of 1,000,000 to celebrate the rapidly approaching 50 million mark?

Canon debuts low-light lovin’ PowerShot SD4000 IS digicam

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Ah, Spring. The season of pollen, grass mowing and enlarged electricity bills. Oh, and impending vacations. In order to get you prepared for that last one, Canon is introducing a new member of its Digital ELPH range today, the PowerShot SD4000 (or IXUS 300HS in other parts of the globe). Boasting a 10 megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor, DIGIC 4 image processing engine and a 3.8x optical zoom, this one also features an f/2.0 lens and the company’s own HS System in order to produce more satisfactory results in low light situations. It also touts an 8.4fps burst capture rate, an HD movie mode, HDMI output support, a Super Slow Motion movie mode (240fps) and a 3-inch rear LCD. Those who love riding the cutting edge will also appreciate the SDXC and Eye-Fi support, and if you’re already sold on the $349.99 device, you simply need to choose between red, silver, black or a limited edition white. Commence pondering.

Canon AE-1 Program SLR gets a digital retrofit

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A classic SLR film camera gutted and given a digital upgrade — blasphemy? Maybe, but there’s no denying that this mod by Diego Monge is plenty impressive. He started out with a Canon AE-1 Program SLR, and apparently simply stuffed the guts of a compact digital camera of some sort inside, resulting in what he calls the AE-1 Program Digital — a 9-megapixel camera complete with image stabilization, a functional flash, and 4GB of memory (non-removable, it seems). Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any details on the build process, let alone a how-to, but you can at least get a glimpse of it in action in the video after the break.
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